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How to Sous Vide a Steak Without Immersion Circulator

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This article explain how to sous vide a steak without immersion circulator, using a simple recipe and minimum cooking utensils.

If you were looking for a steak cooking method that gives a perfect result EVERY time, then sous vide is certainly for you.

This simple cooking technique, which doesn’t require you being physically present at the cooking spot, is what I really like about it.

 

how-to-sous-vide-steak-without-immersion-circulator

 

All you need a thick, good quality (i.e. organic grass-fed) steak, a food-safe plastic bag and a warm water bath for about an hour.

After that we only need to sear the steak’s surface and we are good to go – l o v e l y! 🙂

As you see, we are not using immersion circulator – an expensive (but useful) device that really helps to control the temperature inside the water bath.

We will instead rely on our ovens to make things happen.

I hope you are intrigued…let’s dive in!

Contents:

 

 

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Part 1: Ingredients & Tools You Need

Once again, the idea behind this guide is to cover the actual TECHNIQUE, that’s why the recipe is very simple.

Here is what you need:

  • 1-inch thick steak
  • 1 tsp ghee or coconut oil
  • 1 tbsp organic grass-fed butter
  • Kosher/flaked salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper

And the following tools:

  • Dutch oven
  • Food-safe plastic bag
  • Oven-safe candy/oil thermometer
  • Paper towels
  • Blowtorch or Skillet
  • Meat tongs

The Dutch oven is not a must-have. Any heat-resistant oven-proof casserole or saucepan will do just as good (ceramic is better for temperature maintenance though).

Ready? Let’s SteakEat!

 

 

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Part 2: How to Sous Vide a Steak Without Immersion Circulator in 5 Steps

 

And now we are going to look closely at the details and see how to actually sous vide a steak to perfection…

However I must warn you.

If you are using sous vide method first time, you might run into a relatively time-consuming process, because you will need to become ‘good friends’ with your oven and other tools behaviors.

Once you get to know them all, you will find sous vide without immersion circulator much easier.

Let’s go!

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It is convenient, EASY-to-print and includes these awesome photos from below!

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Step 1: Water & the Dutch Oven

Everything starts with the Dutch oven – fill it up with warm water (taking it from the tap is fine), so there is enough of it for both, the steak you are cooking and the candy/oil thermometer.

We’ll use it to help us control the water temperature inside the water bath (look at it every once in while during the cooking process, as you might need to adjust the temperature as you go).

Place the Dutch oven inside the actual cooking oven (stove top will also do) and start heating up the temperature (next step for more details).

I totally recommend oven over stove top, because temperature control (i.e. thermostat) is better at maintaining the temperature we need and that’s essential for sous vide cooking.

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Step 2: Sous Vide Steak Cooking Temperature

And now – the temperature. Which one to choose..?

It all depends on the doneness level you would like to choose.

For example, I am a rare steak fan, so I will only heat up the water to 50C / 122F (exactly the inside temperature of the rare steak).

If you like, medium-rare or better still medium, go for 55C / 130F and 60C / 140F respectively.

Easy! 😉

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Step 3: Get the Steak Ready

Now the easy part – put the steak inside the food-safe plastic* bag (e.g. freezer) and zip it, letting all the air out.

You want to have some form of vacuum inside, so try as good as you can!

Note that we are NOT adding any salt or pepper at this stage.

They go in later, because salt, when used for a long time, will deteriorate the steak’s surface drying it out, while pepper will get burnt at high temperature, when we are seariung the steak at the end (it will give off charred flavor).

* Unfortunately even food-safe plastic is not the healthiest choice, because some chemicals still affect the food you are cooking (and even storing). At the moment of writing, sous vide community believes that reusable silicon bags is the safer option.

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This is Page 2 of the ‘How to Sous Vide Steak’ guide. Click here for Page 1.

 

Step 4: Sous Vide the Steak

Once the ‘steak bag’ is ready, check the temperature inside the Dutch oven water bath.

In my case, once it’s at 50C / 122F, I’m good to go – drop the steak gently inside the Dutch oven and close the oven again.

Pay attention to the thermometer, because the water temperature might change after you put the steak inside, especially if it was right out from the fridge (not a problem with sous vide).

So I put the steak inside and the reading now shows 45C / 113F (instead of 50C / 122F).

I then wait for 10 minutes (with the Dutch oven inside the preheated oven) and check the oil/candy thermometer.

If the temperature has reached 50C / 122F, I leave the oven setting unchanged and still come back in 10 minutes to check whether the temperature has not increased further.

If the temperature is still low, increase the oven’s temperature by 10C / 20F and check the thermometer in a couple of minutes.

Again, the first time sous vide cooking (especially without the circulator) IS time-consuming, but it gets much, much easier as you do more of it (for example, you know at which temperature setting your oven produces your desired level of doneness).

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Step 5: Cooking Times for Sous Vide

How long to sous vide your steak in the water bath?

It really depends on its thickness…here is the table:

Thickness                           Cooking Time

0.25 inches                        23 minutes
0.5 inches                           31 minutes
1 inch                                   60 minutes
1.5 inches                           1 hour 45 minutes
2 inches                               2 hours 50 minutes
2.5 inches                           4 hours 15 minutes
3 inches                               6 hours

As you can see, a 1-inch thick steak will need at least 1 hour to get ready, but…

It doesn’t mean that if you sous vide for longer than 60 minutes, you will end up with overcooked, dry piece of beef.

After all, the temperature (provided you controlled for it) is stable at whatever you want it to be (50C / 122F for me), so the steak can’t cook more than that.

Taking the point further…longer sous vide cooking is especially beneficial for tougher cuts like flank, skirt and chuck, as they have more time to tenderize at low & moist type of heat.

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Step 6: Brown the Steak’s Surface

After the 60 (or more) minutes have passed, take the ‘steak bag’ out from the warm water bath, cut it open and place it on a plate.

Remember that it is still technically a raw piece of meat, so you must treat it accordingly.

Now we are going to sear the steak’s surface in order to fix the browning – I want you to have a delicious steak!

To do that, you can either use my favorite blowtorch or standard pan-searing.

Let’s look at the blowtorch first, but before that…

  • Pat the steak dry using paper towels to help browning develop easier and quicker.
  • Season the steak with coarse Kosher salt (it’s still not the time for pepper).

 

How to Sear Steak With Blowtorch After Sous Vide

  1. Light up your torch and set it to the maximum temperature.
  2. Carefully sear both sides, so that they develop rich browning.
  3. Once ready, add freshly ground pepper (here it is) and let the steak rest for 3-4 minutes.
  4. Cut & serve – you are good to go!

SteakEat Tip: If you have a blowtorch, make sure it’s a powerful, professional type. There are many ‘creme brulee’ torches, which are just not powerful enough to sear the steak.

 

No blowtorch? Not a big deal…here is the standard method.

How to Sear Top Sirloin Steak After Sous Vide Cooking Using Pan

  1. Add the teaspoon of ghee/coconut oil inside the skillet.
  2. Start heating it up at high heat on stove top.
  3. Once you see gentle fumes taking off the skillet, count till 20 and put the steak inside – this way we can guarantee the skillet is hot enough.
  4. You will hear gentle sizzling sound – sear each side for 60 seconds. Flip with meat tongs.
  5. Once ready, transfer the steak on a plate.
  6. Season with freshly ground black pepper and let it rest under tin foil for 3-5 minutes.
  7. Cut & serve.

SteakEat Tip: Looking for extra flavor and browning? Add a tablespoon of organic grass-fed butter 30 seconds before you are done searing the steak and flip it 2-3 times, letting the surface absorb that extra flavor and browning.

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[ninja-popup ID=2775]Download this ‘How to Sous Vide Steak in Oven’ Guide in PDF format.[/ninja-popup]

It is convenient, EASY-to-print and includes the awesome photos from above!

That’s pretty much it…

 

How to sous vide a steak without immersion circulator?

You’ve seen the method. 🙂

 

Happy Steaks!

SteakEat

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How to Sous Vide Rib Eye Steak Without Immersion Circulator

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This cooking guide explains how to sous vide rib eye steak without using expensive immersion circulator.

Could you ever believe that for a restaurant-class steak, all you need is a plastic food bag and a bit of warm water?

Get ready for excellence every time – this is what sous vide is all about.

 

how-to-sous-vide-rib-eye-steak-without-immersion-circulator-in-dutch-oven

 

The method is simplicity in itself – place your rib eye inside the plastic bag, sealing it to let all the air out, put in a warm water bath and cook it for an hour or so. Then quickly sear it in skillet and you are ready to enjoy your sous vide rib eye steak.

Contents:

 

 

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Part 1: Required Ingredients & Cooking Utensils

The goal of this guide is nothing but explaining the actual cooking technique, that’s why we are using a simple recipe, where nothing can go wrong.

All you need is:

  • 1-inch thick rib eye steak
  • 1 tsp ghee or coconut oil
  • 1 tbsp organic grass-fed butter
  • Kosher/flaked salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper

And these cooking utensils:

  • Dutch oven
  • Food-safe plastic bag
  • Oven-safe candy/oil thermometer
  • Paper towels
  • Blowtorch or Skillet
  • Meat tongs

Note that any oven-safe saucepan will do fine, so Dutch oven is not a must.

Have these ready? Let’s SteakEat!

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It is convenient, EASY-to-print and includes these awesome photos from below!

[wpanchor id=”2″]

 

Part 2: Sous Vide Rib Eye Steak in 5 Steps

Even though sous vide can be seen as a time-consuming cooking method, the good news is that you don’t need to be there all the time.

Let’s look at the method closely.

 

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Step 1: Set the Dutch Oven

Fix candy or oil thermometer on the Dutch oven (they often have attachment clips) and pour in enough water to at least cover the bottom part of the thermometer. Also remember that there should be enough to also fit the steak.

Now start heating up the oven and place the Dutch oven inside.

I recommend oven (instead of stove top), because it’s generally easier to control the temperature inside it.

Plus they are safer, if you decide to leave for a bit.

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Step 2: Cooking Temperature

What’s the temperature for a perfect sous vide rib eye steak?

It depends, on what level of doneness you are looking for.

So, if you are like me, you’d pick 50C / 122F to shoot for rare.

If you are into more thoroughly cooked steak, choose 55C / 130F or 60C / 140F for medium-rare and medium respectively.

This is the temperature you need to maintain during the entire cooking process, so check your thermometer regularly.

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This is Page 2 of the ‘How to Sous Vide Rib Eye Steak’ guide. Click to Page 1.

 

Step 3: Preparing the Rib Eye

Now it’s time to put the steak inside plastic*, food-safe bag, which you can seal, letting all the air out.

We are not using any salt or pepper now, because one will dry the steak out, while the second will burn at high heat, when we need to pan-sear the steak.

 

* Even food-safe freezer bags were reported as not entirely safe from the health perspective.

At this stage reusable silicon bags is considered the safest option.

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Step 4: And Sous Vide…

Now that we have the temperature set up and the water is ready, put the steak inside the water bath and close the oven again.

Remember, if the temperature is fixed at the certain level (e.g. 50C / 122F for rare doneness), rib eye can’t get overcooked.

Having said that, there are minimum cooking times, which are subject to your steak’s thickness.

Here is what they look like:

Thickness                           Cooking Time

0.25 inches                        23 minutes
0.5 inches                           31 minutes
1 inch                                   60 minutes
1.5 inches                           1 hour 45 minutes
2 inches                               2 hours 50 minutes
2.5 inches                           4 hours 15 minutes
3 inches                               6 hours

It follow that we need to cook 1-inch thick rib eye for at least one hour, but…if you leave it there for two hours, it won’t overcook.

Instead you might even find a more delicious, tenderer steak.

 

Remember to control water temperature.

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Step 5: Sear & Brown Rib Eye

Once you are done, all we need is to sear the rib eye, so that it develops a proper steak-like browning on the surface.

I love using blowtorch for that, but a standard stove top skillet is perfectly fine.

Let’s look at it first.

Searing Rib Eye Steak on Stove Top After Sous Vide
  1. Open the plastic bag, transferring the steak onto a cutting board or a plate.
  2. Pat its surface dry using paper towels and season with Kosher salt – now is the time to do it.
  3. Add the teaspoon of coconut oil/ghee to the skillet and start heating it up on stove top at max heat.
  4. You will soon see fumes taking off the skillet’s surface, take another 20 seconds and place the rib eye right inside.
  5. After you hear gently sizzling, set the timer – all you need is 1 minute per side.
  6. Flip the steak using meat tongs and repeat for the second side.
  7. Once the time runs off, transfer the steak on to another plate (no cross-contamination please) and let it rest for 2-3 minutes.
  8. Add aromatic freshly ground pepper, cut and serve!

SteakEat Tip: Once you are 30 seconds away from finishing with side #2, add the tablespoon of organic grass-fed butter and use meat tongs to flip your rib eye. It helps to add extra flavor and surface browning.

Now – my favorite – the blowtorch…

 

Searing Rib Eye Steak With Blowtorch After Sous Vide
  1. Open the plastic bag, transferring the steak onto a cutting board or a plate.
  2. Pat its surface dry using paper towels and season with Kosher salt – now is the time to do it.
  3. Light your blowtorch and set it to max power.
  4. Start searing the sides and flip the steak around to reach everywhere – that’s why I like blowtorch so much.
  5. After you are done, let the steak rest for 2 minutes and season it with freshly ground black pepper for the aroma.
  6. Cut across the grain and enjoy.

Caution: Please be careful with blowtorch – open fire is a dangerous thing.

SteakEat Tip: For this blowtorch trick to work, you’ll need a powerful, professional torch – creme brulee versions won’t work.

[/dropshadowbox]
steakeat-approvedFREE Bonus:
[ninja-popup ID=2865]Download this ‘How to Sous Vide Rib Eye in Oven’ Guide in PDF format.[/ninja-popup]

It is convenient, EASY-to-print and includes these awesome photos from above!

How to sous vide rib eye steak without immersion circulator, suing simple tools?

I hope this guide was helpful. 🙂

 

Happy Steaks!

SteakEat

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How to Sous Vide Filet Mignon in 5 Quick Steps

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This manual explains how to sous vide filet mignon without immersion circulator using dutch oven instead.

Making the most tender steak even more tender? That’s what filet mignon sous vide is all about.

how-to-sous-vide-filet-mignon-tender-without-immersion-circulatorThis simple, reliable cooking technique guarantees a perfect fillet steak just about every time you cook it.

All you need is placing it inside a food-safe plastic bag, followed by 30-minute-long cooking in a warm water bath with a quick pan-sear right at the end to get that delicious browned surface.

Contents:

 

 

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Part 1: Ingredients & Tools

The goal of this article is to show the actual sous vide technique in action, including cooking times and temperature…

This is why the recipe is ‘nothing’ but a traditional salt-n-pepper style:

  • 1-inch thick filet mignon steak
  • 1 tsp ghee or coconut oil
  • 1 tbsp organic grass-fed butter
  • Kosher/flaked salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper

We also need these tools:

  • Dutch oven
  • Food-safe plastic bag
  • Oven-safe candy/oil thermometer
  • Paper towels
  • Blowtorch or Skillet
  • Meat tongs

By the way, dutch oven is not a must – a standard oven- and heat-proof casserole will do just as well!

Let’s SteakEat!

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It is convenient, EASY-to-print and includes these awesome photos from below!

[wpanchor id=”2″]

Part 2: Cooking Filet Mignon Sous Vide in 5 Quick Steps

Now that we got all the tools and ingredients, let’s look, in detail, at our DIY fillet steak sous vide method.

Up the Dutch oven!

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Step 1: Preheat Water

The first step is filling the Dutch oven with the sufficient amount of water – it must touch at least the bottom part of your oven-safe candy or oil thermometer, so that you can control its temperature.

Once that’s ready, I recommend you place it inside the oven, preheated to the required temperature (more on it in Step 2).

Ovens tend to be easier to control and safer to use than open fire or electric stove tops (doesn’t apply to induction).

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Step 2: Cooking Temperature

What’s the secret behind a juicy, tender steak?

The answer is – low cooking temperature. Sous vide technique is all about that.

Water temperature must equal to the doneness level you are looking for (i.e. the steak’s inside temperature, once it’s cooked and ready to be eaten).

You like medium-rare fillet steak?

Go for 55C / 130F water temperature .

For rare and medium doneness, shoot for 50C / 122F and 60C / 140F respectively.

Look at the thermometer reading regularly to adjust oven temperature, if necessary.

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This is Page 2 of ‘How to Sous Vide Filet Mignon’ guide. Click to Page 1.

 

Step 3: Mignon Preparations

The water inside your Dutch is approaching the required temperature and you need to take care of the actual filet mignon.

Put it inside the food-safe plastic* bag (those freezer ones are quite good) and let all the air out before sealing it under vacuum.

Note that we are NOT adding any salt or pepper at this stage (however, if we were making some herb-based steak marinade, we would add the mixture now).

Salt will suck out juices from the steak and pepper will burn when we sear it on stove (we add it when the steak will be resting at the end).

* Plastic, even of BPA-free food-safe type is not great for when it comes to even low-heat temperature treatment – some chemicals still escape and get absorbed by food.

Currently silicon bags, which are reusable, are considered a better alternative.

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Step 4: Time to Sous Vide!

Cooking times are important, because we don’t want to overcook steak…but it doesn’t apply to sous vide.

Depending on steak thickness, there are cooking times estimates which will serve as a good starting point for you:

Thickness                           Cooking Time

0.25 inches                        23 minutes
0.5 inches                           31 minutes
1 inch                                   60 minutes
1.5 inches                           1 hour 45 minutes
2 inches                               2 hours 50 minutes
2.5 inches                           4 hours 15 minutes
3 inches                               6 hours

What would happen if you cook your 1-inch thick filet mignon for 2 hours instead of one?

Absolutely nothing – your steak will still stay medium-rare, provided the water temperature in Dutch oven is fixed at 55C / 130F.

You might even end up with a tenderer result than you could even think of, because moist heat now has more time to break all the tougher connective tissues in your steak (it doesn’t apply to beef tenderloin as such, because it’s tender by default; it will certainly make a difference for a tougher cut like flank steak).

All in all, I recommend you don’t exceed the 30-minute threshold for tenderloin steak.

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Step 5: Browning Filet Mignon

One huge disadvantage of sous vide is that there is no surface browning developed during cooking…

However it’s very easy to fix with a quick sear on stove top or, my favorite, using a blowtorch.

Let’s look at both methods!

Sear Filet Mignon With Blowtorch

  1. Take the steak out from the plastic bag and pat it dry with paper towels.
  2. Season with Kosher salt – 2-3 pinches per side is all you need.
  3. Ge the torch running at maximum heat and start searing the surface directly.
  4. Flip the steak and repeat the process for side #2.
  5. Once you are done, season it with freshly ground pepper to develop aroma and let it rest for 2-3 minutes.
  6. Cut & serve.

Caution: open fire is dangerous and you should be careful when handling it – please watch out.

Pro Tip: You need a powerful professional blowtorch to do that, since smaller blowtorches can’t generate enough heat output to properly sear the tenderloin’s surface.

Got a blowtorch? Fire up!

 

Quickly Sear Fillet Steak on Stove Top After Sous Vide
  1. Take the steak out from the plastic bag and pat it dry with paper towels.
  2. Season with Kosher salt – 2-3 pinches per side is all you need.
  3. Preheat the skillet on stove top, adding the teaspoon of ghee/coconut oil.
  4. Watch for light fumes to take off the skillet, count till 10 when you see them and place the steak inside.
  5. Sear for 1 minute per side to develop the browning.
  6. Once ready, transfer to a cutting board/plate and season with freshly ground black pepper.
  7. Rest for 3-4 minutes, cut, serve and enjoy! 🙂

Pro Tip: Filet mignon is relative flavorless steak. Adding the tablespoon of organic grass-fed butter 30 seconds before finishing searing it on side #2, will add a ton of flavor and help browning even better.

[/dropshadowbox]
steakeat-approvedFREE Bonus:
[ninja-popup ID=2843]Download this ‘How to Sous Vide Filet Mignon in Oven’ Guide in PDF format.[/ninja-popup]

It is convenient, EASY-to-print and includes these awesome photos from above!

How to sous vide filet mignon without immersion circulator using a simple dutch oven?

Now you know the way. 🙂

 

Happy Steaks!

SteakEat

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How to Sous Vide Top Sirloin Steak in Dutch Oven

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Here I explain how to sous vide top sirloin steak without immersion circulator.

Is it possible to practically not pay attention to steak cooking process and still get an amazingly delicious, succulent and tender piece of red meat?

If you don’t believe in that, try sous vide.

how-to-sous-vide-top-sirloin-steak-in-dutch-oven

The idea behind this cooking technique is quite simple.

Grab a steak, seal in a vacuum food-safe plastic bag, drop it into a preheated water bath and keep it there for an hour or so.

Once ready, sear the steak to develop browning and you are ready to enjoy.

Now, let’s look at the process: temperature, cooking times and so on…are all included.

Contents:

 

 

 

[wpanchor id=”1″]

Part 1: Cooking Ingredients & Tools for Sirloin Sous Vide

The idea is to explain the METHOD, so I am using a simple salt-n-pepper recipe:

  • 1-inch thick top sirloin steak
  • 1 tsp ghee or coconut oil
  • 1 tbsp organic grass-fed butter
  • Kosher/flaked salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper

And the following tools:

  • Dutch oven
  • Food-safe plastic bag
  • Oven-safe candy/oil thermometer
  • Paper towels
  • Blowtorch or Skillet
  • Meat tongs

Now that we are ready, let’s SteakEat!

 

[wpanchor id=”2″]

Part 2: Sous Vide Top Sirloin Steak in 5 Simple Steps

Since we are not using immersion circulator, the process will be a bit trickier, but…it’s totally doable.

Let’s get right to it.

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Tired of ads and scrolling?

Avoid them – [ninja-popup ID=2807]download this ‘How to Sous Vide Sirloin Steak’ Guide in PDF format.[/ninja-popup]

It is convenient, EASY-to-print and includes these awesome photos from below!

[dropshadowbox align=”center” effect=”vertical-curve-both” width=”autopx” height=”” background_color=”#ffffff” border_width=”1″ border_color=”#dddddd” ]

Step 1: Prepare Dutch Oven

Pour enough water into Dutch oven – anywhere between 1/2 and 2/3 is perfect.

Set the candy or oil thermometer so that it shows water temperature inside the Dutch oven – there is often a handy clip, which you can use to attach it to the Dutch oven.

Note that you need water to touch, at least, its bottom part.

Once that’s ready, start heating up the water .

I recommend using the actual oven, because it is oftentimes easier to set and control temperature inside it (especially electric, digital ones).

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Step 2: Sous Vide Sirloin Steak Temperature

The water temperature must be equal to the steak’s doneness level you are looking to achieve.

So, if you are medium-rare fan, go for 55C / 130F water temperature .

For rare and medium doneness, shoot for 50C / 122F and 60C / 140F respectively.

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Step 3: Prepare the Steak

All you need now is to take your top sirloin, place it inside the food-safe plastic* bag and seal it, letting all the air out.

We won’t be using any salt or pepper now. Salt will dry out the surface and take the juices from the steak, while pepper will burn at a later stage, when we’ll be searing our sirloin to develop the browning we’d like to have.

* One of the best options is freezer bags. However they are still made of plastic, which causes health concerns… At this stage sous vide community agrees that reusable silicon bags is the way to go.

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[/dropshadowbox] [/nextpage] [nextpage title=”Part 2″ ] [dropshadowbox align=”center” effect=”vertical-curve-both” width=”autopx” height=”” background_color=”#ffffff” border_width=”1″ border_color=”#dddddd” ]

This is Page of the ‘How to Sous Vide Flat Iron Steak’ guide. Click to Page 1.

 

Step 4: Sous Vide Sirloin Cooking Times

As a rule of thumb, we cook all steaks up to 1-inch for 60 minutes.

However, in case you need more precision, here are the minimum cooking times listed, depending on your top sirloin’ thickness:

Thickness                           Cooking Time

0.25 inches                        23 minutes
0.5 inches                           31 minutes
1 inch                                   60 minutes
1.5 inches                           1 hour 45 minutes
2 inches                               2 hours 50 minutes
2.5 inches                           4 hours 15 minutes
3 inches                               6 hours

Note that you can’t overcook your steak, even if you leave it for 4 hours, as long as the temperature inside the Dutch oven is not changed from the one you set it to.

That’s why you don’t really need to control anything and can just leave and do other things, however…

Truth be said, it is quite tricky (and risky) to live your oven/stove running while you are not there.

This is why I recommend you either get a sous vide minioven or an immersion calculator like this. They are much safer and easier to use than our DIY sous vide technique. 🙂

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Step 5: Get the Surface Browned

As soon as the time runs out, take your steak out from the Dutch oven and open up the plastic bag.

All we have to do now is to sear the surface, so it has that browning (i.e. flavor) ready for you to enjoy.

I like prefer blow torch, but using a standard pan-searing technique will do just as fine.

Let’s start with it first.

How to Sear Top Sirloin Steak After Sous Vide Cooking Using Pan

  1. Pat dry your steak with paper towels and season it with kosher salt – still no need for pepper.
  2. Add the teaspoon of ghee/coconut oil and start heating up the skillet to high heat.
  3. Once you notice gentle fumes taking off the skillet’s surface, count till 20 and put the steak inside – this way we can guarantee that the skillet is hot enough to actually sear the meat.
  4. Sear the steak for 1 minute per side.
  5. Transfer it on to a cutting board or a plate to rest for 3-5 minutes – now is the time to add freshly ground black pepper.
  6. Then cut and serve!

Pro Tip: Once you are 30 seconds away from finishing to sear the second side, add the tablespoon of organic grass-fed butter to help develop super rich flavor and even more surface browning.

 

How to Sear Top Sirloin Steak With Blow Torch

  1. Pat dry sirloin top sirloin with paper towels and season it with flaked kosher salt – I recommend 2-3 pinches per side.
  2. Light up your blow torch and go around the whole cut, searing its sides until you see the browning developing.
  3. Repeat for all the sides, turning steak around.
  4. Add freshly ground black pepper on the surface and let the top sirloin rest for 2-3 minutes.
  5. Cut & serve!

Caution: Blow torch is not a toy and can be quite dangerous – be careful when using open fire.

Also note that typical creme brulee blow torch is not the same as a pro torch and won’t have enough power to develop that browning.

[/dropshadowbox]
steakeat-approvedFREE Bonus:
[ninja-popup ID=2807]Download this ‘How to Sous Vide Sirloin Steak’ Guide in PDF format.[/ninja-popup]

It is convenient, EASY-to-print and includes these awesome photos from above!

How to sous vide top sirloin steak in Dutch oven?

Now you know. 🙂

 

Happy Steaks!

SteakEat

[/nextpage]

How To Sous Vide Flat Iron Steak Without Immersion Circulator

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[nextpage title=”Part 1″ ]

This article explains how to sous vide flat iron steak, using a simple recipe and minimum tools to illustrate the method behind.

Contents:

 

how-to-sous-vide-flat-iron-steak-without-immersion-circulator

 

[wpanchor id=”1″]

Part 1: Ingredients & Sous Vide Tools

The ingredients we’ll be using:

  • 1-inch thick flat iron steak
  • 1 tsp ghee or coconut oil
  • 1 tbsp organic grass-fed butter
  • Kosher/flaked salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper

With the following tools:

  • Dutch oven
  • Food-safe plastic bag*
  • Oven safe candy/oil thermometer
  • Meat tongs
  • Paper towels
  • Blowtorch or Skillet

Got them all? Let’s SteakEat!

steakeat-approvedFREE Bonus:

Tired of ads and scrolling?

Avoid them – [ninja-popup ID=2903]download this ‘How to Sous Vide Flat Iron Steak’ Guide in PDF format.[/ninja-popup]

It is convenient, EASY-to-print and includes these awesome photos from below!

[wpanchor id=”2″]

 

Part 2: Sous Vide Flat Iron Steak in 5 Steps

The idea behind sous vide is simple.

Seal your steak inside a food-safe vacuum plastic bag and leave it in water, warmed up to a certain temperature for a couple of hours.

Then sear the steak with blow torch or in skillet in order to develop surface browning.

Now let’s look into details. 🙂

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Step 1: Fill up Dutch Oven

Start with a Dutch oven and fill it about 2/3 full of warm water. Ideally fix a candy or oil thermometer so that it measures the temperature of the water.

Start heating it up on the stove or inside the oven (I recommend the oven, since it gives a more even type of heat).

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Step 2: Sous Vide Flat Iron Steak Temperature

Increase the temperature of the water to the correct temperature over a medium heat.

So if you’d like a medium-rare flat iron steak, go for 55C / 130F water temperature.

If you are going for rare or medium level of doneness, use 50C / 122F and 60C / 140F temperature setting respectively.

[/dropshadowbox] [/nextpage] [nextpage title=”Part 2″ ] [dropshadowbox align=”center” effect=”vertical-curve-both” width=”autopx” height=”” background_color=”#ffffff” border_width=”1″ border_color=”#dddddd” ]

Step 3: Zip the Steak

Place your flat iron steak into a zip lock plastic food-safe bag and squeeze out all of the air before sealing the zip lock*.

Note that we don’t add any salt or pepper now.

Salt will deteriorate flat iron’s surface, while pepper will burn, when we sear the steak later.

There were some health concerns, regarding plastic leaching endocrine disrupting chemicals into food (not just during cooking). As for now sous vide community found the least harmful alternative to “food-safe” plastic zip lock bags – silicone bags, which can be used more than once. 

[/dropshadowbox] [dropshadowbox align=”center” effect=”vertical-curve-both” width=”autopx” height=”” background_color=”#ffffff” border_width=”1″ border_color=”#dddddd” ]

Step 4: Sous Vide Cooking Times

Immerse the steak bag in the Dutch oven with the temperature set according to the level of doneness you want to achieve (55C / 130F for medium-rare) and cook it for the time required depending on thickness:

Thickness                           Required cooking time

0.25 inches                        23 minutes
0.5 inches                           31 minutes
1 inch                                   60 minutes
1.5 inches                           1 hour 45 minutes
2 inches                               2 hours 50 minutes
2.5 inches                           4 hours 15 minutes
3 inches                               6 hours

Remember – you can’t overcook the steak, if the temperature is fixed, so, even if you forget about your cooking and come back in 3 or 4 hours, your steak will not be overcooked. In fact, there is a good chance it will even be more tender and flavorful!

However, keeping constant temperature inside the oven and leaving it unattended is a risky business…

This is why, if you find yourself falling in love with sous vide, I recommend you either get a sous vide minioven or an immersion calculator like this.

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Step 5: Brown the Surface

Once you are done sous viding, you now need to sear the flat iron’s surface.

I love using blow torch, because it so easy and requires zero preparation, but I of course show how to use classical stove top method.

Let’s start with the blow torch instructions and then look at how we can use skillet instead.

 

Searing Flat Iron Steak with Blow Torch

The aim is to sear the outside without affecting the meat immediately inside.

Remember, the whole point of sous vide is to have a consistently cooked piece of steak so the thin crust that a flat iron steak will take on after searing with a blow torch is perfect.

To sear your flat iron steak after sous vide:

  1. Remove it from the zip lock bag after the required amount of time has passed.
  2. Pat it completely dry with paper towels.
  3. Season with coarse Kosher salt.
  4. Light your blow torch and turn it to the highest heat.
  5. Apply the flame evenly to the surface and edges of the flat iron steaks until a golden browned crust develops.
  6. Season your steak with freshly ground pepper.
  7. Then cut and serve.

HINT: Make sure it’s a professional blow torch, which can generate enough heat to sear the steak immediately. Less powerful torches, often used for creme brulees, will not have the same effect.

 

Searing Flat Iron Steak in Skillet After Sous Vide

The goal is to sear the steak surface as quickly as possible. It means you should heat up the skillet really well.

  1. Remove the steak from the bag, pat it dry with paper towels and season with kosher salt.
  2. Add a tablespoon of ghee or coconut oil to the skillet and heat it up. You will know it’s ready, when you see gentle smoke coming off it; then wait for another 10 seconds to make sure the pan is hot enough.
  3. Put the steak inside the skillet and sear it for 1 minute per side so it develops the surface browning.
  4. Once ready, rest the steak for two minutes on a plate, season with freshly ground black pepper, cut and serve.

BONUS TIP: Once you are 30 seconds away from finishing to sear the second side, add the tablespoon of organic grass-fed butter. It will explode the flavor and help browning the sides!

[/dropshadowbox]
steakeat-approvedFREE Bonus:
[ninja-popup ID=2903]Download this ‘How to Sous Vide Flat Iron Steak’ Guide in PDF format.[/ninja-popup]

It is convenient, EASY-to-print and includes these awesome photos from above!

[/nextpage] [nextpage title=”Part 3″ ]

Part 3: Buying Guide & Utensils

Now I will explain you more about how I choose a quality flat iron steak and cooking utensils.

Let’s start with the steak. Here is one rule which gives me the best results:

Organic grass-fed. You are what you eat and that applies to beef. If cows eat tasteless grain, antibiotics and growth hormones, then you shouldn’t expect much flavor and health benefit. That’s why I choose organic grass-fed flat iron steak whenever possible. Not only I get the most flavor, I get a ton of vitamins, minerals and satisfaction.

What about quantity? How much steak is necessary?

A good rule of thumb is 200g / 7oz per person. This quality is just right for satiation without getting stuffed. If that’s too much/little, you can adjust it next time.

That’s it with steak from my perspective. Notice how I didn’t mention any fat streaks for when you are choosing beef… The reason is that I don’t believe fat has anything to do with the quality of beef.

All you need is organic grass-fed beef. Now – cooking utensils.

 

Utensils You Need To Sous Vide Flat Iron Steak

Dutch Oven

Truth be said, you can use any saucepan, but Dutch oven is preferable because of its thick walls and its ability to hold heat fairly well. It’s especially important when you don’t use an immersion circulator, which automatically adjusts water temperature. That way Dutch oven can still hold the water temperature for a while, even if the external heat intensity reduced. I recommend using appropriate size Dutch oven if you don’t own an immersion circulator or a special sous vide minioven.

 

Candy/Oil Thermometer

You will need this simple piece of equipment to monitor the water temperature. You can also use your oven-safe meat thermometer if you have one.

 

Salt

We use salt to develop the flavor on the steak’s surface when searing it with blow torch or on stove top.

I recommend using coarse kosher salt – its density is lower than that of table salt, so you can put more of it without overshooting the mark.

 

Pepper

Freshly ground pepper is perfect for when your steak is already seared. I don’t recommend buying ground pepper – it’s susceptible to the atmosphere and loses both, flavor and aroma, when not used quickly enough.

Grind your black peppercorns right before serving the steak.

 

Food-Safe Plastic Bags

Your simple solution for a once-off sous vide session is a food-safe resealable zipper storage bag.

However there are concerns regarding chemicals from these leaching into meat even when being cooked at low temperature like 55C / 130F.

If you are really into sous vide, try minimizing possible negative impacts by using special sous vide cooking pouches.

 

Paper Towels        

Pat drying is a must before searing the steak’s surface and that’s why we need paper towels. Get a roll and keep it in your kitchen for things like this.

 

Blow Torch

I use blow torch for searing flat iron steak’s surface after sous vide cooking – it’s fun!

One thing you need to be aware of is blow torch power. Crème Brulee style torches are of no use and will boil your steak instead of searing it.

If you are planning to invest in a tool of that caliber, I recommend going for something like this instead. It costs twice as much as ‘crème brulee’, but it does the job and won’t break in a long time. After all most of us are not that rich to afford buying cheap things.

 

If you don’t have a blow torch, you will need this instead:

 

Skillet

Thick-walled heavy skillet is ideal. Forged aluminum is my choice for its non-sticky properties and even heating. You only need the skillet to quickly sear the steak’s surface, so there is no need to go very fancy this time.

 

Cooking Oil

I recommend using ghee or coconut oil (not extra virgin). Both of these oils have a high smoking point and are very heat-stable. A tablespoon is all you need.

 

That’s all you need for this simple cooking process, but, if you are into sous vide and do it frequently, I recommend you invest in an immersion circulator which helps you turn any cooking dish into a sous vide water bath or maybe even get the actual sous vide water oven.

 

To summarize, this is all you need for cooking flat iron steak sous vide:

  • Flat iron steak
  • Salt (ideally kosher)
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Dutch oven
  • Candy/Oil Thermometer
  • Food-safe plastic bag*
  • Paper towels
  • For searing steak: Blowtorch or Skillet with 1 tbsp of coconut oil / ghee

If you haven’t yet cooked your steak, jump to Part 1 and do it. Or you can also go directly to Part 3 where you can find some recipes and sous vide cooking tips.

[/nextpage] [nextpage title=”Part 4″ ]

 

Part 4: Pro Tips on Sous Vide

By now we have already made our sous vide flat iron steak in Part 1 and saw how to buy a quality steak and cooking utensils in Part 2.

This bit here is dedicated to cooking tips and recipes. Let’s check them out.

 

Tip 1: Seasoning

Choosing ingredients that are umami rich will give a particularly defined flavor to the completed flat iron steak.

For a good sous vide flat iron steak recipe, try mixing fish sauce, Worcestershire sauce and anchovy paste with blue cheese for a flavoursome marinade

 

Tip 2: Prolonged Cooking

As you saw in the table in Part 2, you only need 30 minutes to cook a 0.5inch steak. There I mentioned that your steak won’t overcook, if you continue cooking it, once that time runs out. If you keep going for another 30 minutes and maybe even an hour, you will notice your steak becoming even more succulent and tender. It happens because gentle heat breaks down tough connective tissue just like in slow cooking. Use this tip for tougher cuts like flat iron steak and make them restaurant-like!

 

Tip 3: Immersion Circulator

This awesome device converts any cooking container into a sous vide water bath and I highly recommend it for anyone using sous vide cooking method regularly. Not only they simplify the whole process dramatically (you don’t need to think about temperature adjusting at all), but they look cool too.

 

Tip 4: Sous Vide Cooking Bags

As already mentioned, I recommend you get highest quality sous vide cooking bags so to minimize the amount of chemicals leaching inside the steak. Look after this kind of stuff to keep you and your family healthy and looking good.

 

 

How to sous vide flat iron steak without immersion circulator?

Now you know. 🙂

 

Happy Steaks!

SteakEat

[/nextpage]

How To Sous Vide Flat Iron Steak – Best Way

Let’s find out how to sous vide flat iron steak using a simple Dutch oven.

Here I will explain the actual method and you will understand things like steak thickness, required cooking time and so on.

I broke down this guide into three parts to make navigation easier for you.

Part 1: Sous Vide Round Steak – The Method. What exactly is sous vide and how we use it to cook the most succulent flat iron steak.

Part: 2: Buying Guide & Utensils. How to buy a perfect steak and which cooking tools to use in more detail.

Part 3: Pro Tips on Sous Vide. Make your cooking even easier and try some recipes.

 

Part 1: Sous Vide Round Steak – The Method

What Is Sous Vide?

Sous vide is French and literally translated means “under vacuum”.

Meats, fish, poultry, or vegetables are sealed in an airtight bag and cooked very slowly for a long time, in some cases as much as 72 hours in warm water.

 

What You Need

Even though there are numerous options for buying sous vide circulators and water ovens, it doesn’t mean you can’t sous vide without them.

Here is what you need for a no-frills method:

  • Flat iron steak
  • Salt (ideally kosher)
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Dutch oven
  • Food-safe plastic bag*
  • Paper towels
  • For searing steak: Blowtorch or Skillet with 1 tbsp of coconut oil / ghee

 

How Does It Work

The long slow cooking tenderizes the food and ensures that it is cooked throughout, without overcooking the outside.

Cooking a flat iron steak in this way ensures that it is cooked to the same level throughout the meat, something that is particularly difficult to do with conventional cooking techniques.

This way meat requires two stages of cooking.

First, we use a Dutch oven to cook the meat throughout.

Second, we sear the outside of the steak to create the attractive browned look normally associated with the best steaks.

It is a technique that is particularly useful for cooking large, oversized steaks that overcook on the outside before the middle is cooked to the right amount.

You can make flat iron steak very tender with sous vide cooking.

 

Steak Cooking Times for Sous Vide Method

Core temperature is the best way of determining how well cooked your flat iron steak is. A rare steak needs to reach a temperature in the middle, known as core temperature, of 50C / 122F.

Medium rare is at 55C / 130F and medium at 60C / 140F.

The time to reach the required core temperature will be determined by the thickness of your flat iron steak.

The thicker the steak, the longer time it will take to come to temperature.

The core temperature is reached by immersing the steak into a bath of water with the required temperature.

Work out your flat iron steak sous vide time here:

Thickness                           Required cooking time

0.25 inches                        23 minutes
0.5 inches                           31 minutes
1 inch                                   60 minutes
1.5 inches                           1 hour 45 minutes
2 inches                               2 hours 50 minutes
2.5 inches                           4 hours 15 minutes
3 inches                               6 hours

Even though the times for thicker steaks look very long, remember that you do not need to be babysitting your steaks while they are cooking.

Remember – you cannot overcook a steak when you use the sous vide technique as the core temperature will never go above the temperature of the water in the water bath.

And now – let’s cook.

 

Stage One – The Gentle Cook

Cooking your flat iron steak sous vide requires careful planning but is very easy.

Once again, here is all you need for this simple guide:

  • Flat iron steak
  • Salt (ideally kosher)
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Dutch oven
  • Candy/oil thermometer
  • Food-safe plastic bag*
  • Paper towels
  • For searing steak: Blowtorch or Skillet with 1 tbsp of coconut oil / ghee

 

Fill up Dutch Oven

Start with a Dutch oven and fill it about 2/3 full of warm water. Ideally fix a candy or oil thermometer so that it measures the temperature of the water.

Bring it to the desired temperature on the stove or inside the oven (I recommend oven, since it gives a more even heat).

 

Adjust the Temperature

Increase the temperature of the water to the correct temperature over a medium heat. So if you’d like a medium-rare flat iron steak, go for 55C / 130F.

 

Zip the Steak

Place the steaks into a zip lock plastic food-safe bag and squeeze out all of the air before sealing the zip lock*.

Note that we don’t add any salt or pepper. We will do it in stage two, so that we don’t destroy our steak when cooking it with salt for too long.

You can however add dry rubs at this stage – more on that in Part 3.

 

Sous Vide

Immerse the steak bag in the Dutch oven with the temperature set according to the level of doneness you want to achieve (55C / 130F for medium-rare) and cook it for the time required depending on thickness:

Thickness                           Required cooking time

0.25 inches                        23 minutes
0.5 inches                           31 minutes
1 inch                                   60 minutes
1.5 inches                           1 hour 45 minutes
2 inches                               2 hours 50 minutes
2.5 inches                           4 hours 15 minutes
3 inches                               6 hours

 

Remember – you can’t overcook the steak, if the temperature is fixed, but…

This can be hard to achieve with a conventional stove top and oven – temperature control is a tricky thing to adjust, especially if you are dealing with gas cookers and older electric cookers which may be quite inaccurate.

If you find yourself falling in love with sous vide, I recommend you either get a sous vide minioven or an immersion calculator like this.

There were some health concerns, regarding plastic leaching endocrine disrupting chemicals into food (not just during cooking). As for now sous vide community found the least harmful alternative to “food-safe” plastic zip lock bags – silicone bags, which can be used more than once. 

 

Stage Two – The Sear

A chef’s blow torch is the perfect way of searing a steak that has been cooked sous vide, but it’s not a must-have. Regular stove top skillet will do just as well – all you need is to really heat it up well.

Let’s start with the blow torch instructions and then look at how we can use skillet instead.

 

Searing Flat Iron Steak with Blow Torch

The aim is to sear the outside without affecting the meat immediately inside.

Remember, the whole point of sous vide is to have a consistently cooked piece of steak so the thin crust that a flat iron steak will take on after searing with a blow torch is perfect.

To sear your flat iron steak after sous vide:

  • Remove it from the zip lock bag after the required amount of time has passed.
  • Pat it completely dry with paper towels.
  • Season with coarse kosher salt.
  • Light your blow torch and turn it to the highest heat.
  • Apply the flame evenly to the surface and edges of the flat iron steaks until a golden browned crust develops.
  • Season your steak with freshly ground pepper.
  • Then cut and serve.

HINT: Make sure it’s a professional blow torch, which can generate enough heat to sear the steak immediately. Less powerful torches, often used for creme brulees, will not have the same effect.

 

Searing Flat Iron Steak in Skillet After Sous Vide

The goal is to sear the steak surface as quickly as possible. It means you should heat up the skillet really well.

  • Remove the steak from the bag, pat it dry with paper towels and season with kosher salt.
  • Add a tablespoon of ghee or coconut oil to the skillet and heat it up. You will know it’s ready, when you see gentle smoke coming off it; then wait for another 10 seconds to make sure the pan is hot enough.
  • Put the steak inside the skillet and sear it for 1 minute per side so it develops the surface browning.
  • Once ready, rest the steak for two minutes on a plate, season with freshly ground black pepper, cut and serve.

This is all you need to know to cook a flat iron steak using sous vide technique.

And now I invite you to Part 2 where I will better explain how to buy a perfect flat iron steak and show you which cooking utensils you can use in more detail. You can also check out sous vide tips and recipes in Part 3.
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